Posts Categorized Under

Fugue

  1. Fugue Addresses Cloud's “Undifferentiated Heavy Lifting”

    Fugue reduces the cloud's new kinds of undifferentiated heavy lifting—the generic, often complex cloud work every business has to contend with—in a single system that delivers control, visibility, and speed for application governance. Reducing the lift is baked into every part of Fugue, including the first step, installation. With Fugue, no preliminary, extra layers of infrastructure creation, care, and feeding are required to get started. One command bootstraps everything!

  2. Get Your Cloud, See Your Cloud—A Full View with Fugue

    Fugue's new Composer maps your application’s cloud infrastructure with automated, interactive diagrams that show your whole system in real time and the relationships between system components. You can zoom and inspect. You can quickly discover configuration errors and compliance violations. It's introduced with Fugue’s Transcriber—your tool to scan existing AWS cloud services in an account and automate their translation for easy Composer mapping. It doesn’t matter how you stood those services up. You'll see everything with Fugue. The new features are in beta and they're free.

  3. Revisiting Unit Testing and Mocking in Python

    Mike Lin
    Mike Lin

    Senior Software Engineer

    As a follow up to Python Mocking 101: Fake It Before You Make It, this post covers some higher-level software engineering principles demonstrated in our Python testing over the past year and half. In particular, the idea of patching mock objects in unit tests is revisited and explored in greater depth.

  4. Validations Give Government Agencies Speed and Certainty in the Cloud

    Fugue now supports the Amazon Web Services (AWS) GovCloud region, which means federal agencies, like enterprises, can automate operations in the cloud fast, while simultaneously meeting regulatory demands. Fugue deployments start with powerful, but easy-to-understand code declarations in a composition that governs a system’s infrastructure. By including select libraries in that composition with simple import statements, a particular agency’s compliance regime gets integrated from the start. This kind of fully realized policy-as-code provides a scalable protocol for agency cloud ops and increases speed to mission.

  5. Diagnosing and Fixing Memory Leaks in Python

    Mike Lin
    Mike Lin

    Senior Software Engineer

    When your metrics report that a Python component is experiencing random restarts and instability after a few days of uptime, what do you do? In our case, looking at memory usage showed that a component's memory footprint increased monotonically and continuously, indicating a memory leak. A powerful memory tracking tool in the Python standard library, tracemalloc, made it possible to diagnose and fix the leak quickly. In this post, we'll look at how we used it.

  6. Why Write a Book?

    The story of Fugue software is a story about solving your real-world, everyday deployment and operations problems. The Pragmatic Bookshelf has just released Scalable Cloud Ops with Fugue, available now as a beta eBook and soon in paperback. With it, you’ll learn to build, operate, and enforce an evolving application's infrastructure with hands-on tutorials—ultimately running fourteen AWS cloud services in a model that affords low-latency global scaling. And, that's just the start ...

  7. More than the Minimum (C>M)

    Beyond Minimum Viable Cloud (MVC) are metaprogramming capabilities that allow you to compose and orchestrate systems efficiently across compute resources. Those capabilities are the centerpiece of mature cloud implementation.

  8. Why We Built Ludwig — a DSL for the Cloud of Today and the Future

    Fugue uses a new domain-specific language, Ludwig, to describe infrastructure configuration. Before we started building, we looked around for what we wanted, but didn't find it all in one place. We want typical things you do in cloud to be easy, and not feel like programming. We want users to get great error messages, fast. We want a program that compiles to almost always work in the cloud. We want sophisticated work to be possible, but safe, predictable, and shareable.

  9. Fugue Computing: Next Generation Infrastructure Automation Is Here

    The elastic compute systems of any given enterprise are now distributed across tens, hundreds, thousands or more physical nodes running an ever-growing array of cloud services, but there is no central coordinating function to act as a nexus for control and trust. In the midst of this unwieldy reality is an even more compelling reality—that the cloud is not, in fact, merely a collection of infrastructure. It’s the world’s first global computer. And, just as we abstracted the hardware of individual computers decades ago, we can abstract the distributed hardware of the cloud and radically simplify operations complexity.

  10. Immutable Infrastructure Realized: Fugue Computing

    We at Luminal are launching our new vision for computing: Fugue. Fugue embodies a set of core computing patterns that rely upon automating the creation and operations of cloud infrastructure, short-lived compute instances, and simplification of compute instances.

  11. A Future of Cloud

    A Future of Cloud wraps up our three part series with a vision of clouds that become dynamic markets, that support ubiquitous movement of compute resources, and that usher in genuine fidelity of systems through native cloud patterns. This series also includes our previous posts, Minimum Viable Cloud and More than the Minimum.

  12. Minimum Viable Cloud

    Minimum Viable Cloud (MVC) refers to baseline features that cloud providers must offer in order to fully deliver on the promise of cloud. MVC allows developers and users to leverage intrinsic cloud patterns that are emerging and will continue to emerge for years. We explore those here.

  13. We’ll Miss You, Harry Weller, Our Partner, Mentor, & Friend

    Harry Weller, General Partner leading NEA’s east coast venture practice, passed away unexpectedly on November 19, 2016. We reflect on his powerful presence in our lives. He looked into this world and bypassed the routine—working fiercely, shaping vivid insights, sharing a smart magic, driving others forward emphatically and lifting them up generously. He knew that noise was just noise and broke past it. He had the rare wisdom that an explorer finds and shares. Our profound sympathy and love go out to Harry’s family and friends.

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